mock it up

i’m finally back into the swing of designing the first pocket shelter prototype. we made the jump from paper to 3d reality when we mocked-up up the loft sleeping space to get down to fractions of an inch in terms of just how much space seems optimal for sleeping, reading, other such horizontaling, etc. there’s a balance to be found between space above (the loft) and space below (the kitchen/counter area). there’s really no substitute for putting your body in a space to really be able to understand what it is and what it wants to be.

i’m folding what we learned from the mockup into the construction drawings, which are close to finished. i hope to actually start framing in the coming week or so! stay tuned.

loft mock up

Expansion

So, in my professional life, I’m a little space hungry. Especially horizontal surfaces, I don’t think it’s possible for me to have enough of them. This is a tad bit ironic, when compared to my personal life where my needs are rather modest. So here in the studio, I had a lofted mezzanine office space and a single, albeit large, drafting table for all my designing and officing needs. And it really didn’t cut it. So I’ve been working on building out an extension to the original mezzanine accessible via catwalk. I love catwalks. More broadly speaking, I love aerial space of all sort. The build-out is almost complete and here’s the result, in all of it’s 14 foot long desk AND drafting table to boot glory:

New Office

3D

It’s been a while since I’ve really had a chance to dive into 3-D design tools for architecture. I switched software platforms from what I used to use (formZ) to 3DS Max Design 2009. It’s a *very* powerful 3D package, especially when it comes to it’s photorealistic rendering capabilities. It’s also a *very* deep and complex program and it’s taking me a bit to get up to speed. This is an early render for a project I’m working on.

Birdseye - SW

2 hour bed

i needed a platform for my bed at home, but frankly, don’t have all that much free time right now to build one. so, i set out to build a bed in two hours over the weekend. ka-ching. success. i started building this platform and was sitting back admiring it’s simplicity and, more importantly, it’s ‘done-ness’ right around 2 hours later. [sound of myself patting me on the back…]2 Hour Bed

20090525-2

Torsion Box

Andy and I finished assembling and glueing-up the two torsion box workbench tops that we’re building for a friend‘s workshop.

Glue-Up

Glue-Up

Grid-Core

From Wikipedia:

A torsion box consists of two skins applied to a core material, usually a grid or framework of some kind. The torsion box functions as a beam, but is considerably lighter than a solid beam of the same size without losing much strength. Torsion boxes are used in the construction of airframes, especially wings and vertical stabilizers, in making wooden tables and doors, and for skis and snowboards.

All Glued

Here Beth gives an assist with strength testing and some much needed compression.

Grid

The assembled grid-core.